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What are the Similarities and differences between anarchism and classical liberalism?

0 votes
What are the similarities in terms of the negative view of the state, the notion of negative freedom and the support for private property? Why does anarchism support private property while saying that 'property is theft'

What are also the differences in terms of how they see human nature, and in terms of the need for public authority?
asked Apr 19, 2016 by anonymous
I don't know of any form of anarchism that supports private property. I don't know of any form of non-academic/purely philosophical anarchism is which the question of "human nature" is relevant.

http://anarchy101.org/2326/private-property-abolished-without-authority-abolish-with?show=2326#q2326

http://anarchy101.org/400/anarchists-have-perspective-on-the-question-of-human-nature

1 Answer

+1 vote
Hopefully none, if it's anything close to the kind of anarchy I want.

Classical liberalism is a 19th? Century ideology derived from the works of Adam Smith -The Wealth of Nations etc.-, involving lots of philosophical ideas from the time like utilitarianism *shudder*.  It fits pretty nicely onto the traditional political spectrum firm to the right.

Anarchy is... ummmm... well... hard to pin down.  Frequently it's hard-left libertarian-communism, anarcho-communists, syndacalists, social anarchists etc. Not much similarity with classical liberalism there.  To (too) many people it means something to do with 'free-market, bitcoin, non-agression principle, recreational nukes, my right to destroy my property even if it's food and there's a famine what are you a fucking fascist-commie'. I try not to get to involved with them.

To me anarchy is about living honestly, openly in the moment, removing all abstractions, and limiting my contact with the 'economy'. It's about joy and play and exploration and discovery and experience. And it's tricky to define, and tricky to realise, but it can be a hell of a lot of fun to try.  My anarchy takes a strong egoist/nihilist slant, and tells a whole lot of shit to fuck off.

So hopefully not a lot in common between the two, but who knows what politicians will be identifying as next?
answered Mar 22 by shinminmetroskyline (1,800 points)
classical liberalism is from the 17th/18th century. It comes from the ideas of people like Locke, Rousseau, and Volatard to name a few. The lassiez faire crap originated with the ideas of Montesquieu. Adam Smith just made it seem cooler by creating the invisible hand of the circle jer... Such a trickster he was.
history and names and classical liberalism aren't my strong-suit.  thanks for the update!
yw I find history to be amusing. You could say anarchism comes out of the reworkings of liberal theorists ideas. Dag!
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