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What are the French saying?

0 votes
Tarnac, Not Bored, Tiqqun, The Invisible Committee... What the heck are these people saying!? I don't know if it's bad translations or original incoherence, or what. A lot of people seem interested in the stuff coming out of France, but I just can get into it. Could someone clue me into some basics?
asked Sep 18, 2010 by enkidu (6,110 points)
edited May 11, 2011 by enkidu

3 Answers

–2 votes
My take on The Invisible Committee:

1. We are French middle-class intellectuals. We spend most of our time dumpster-diving, smoking hash and trying to get laid.

2. After decades of living off the welfare state, attending or working at public universities, and/or mooching off friends who do one of the above, our "ultimate quests" for maximum personal freedom have mostly ended in ennui.

3. We are hopeful that adolescent thugs in suburban housing projects will come to our rescue, as they are still "real."
answered Dec 17, 2010 by Tower of Babel (580 points)
+2 votes
a. not bored is a translator of french theory.
b. tarnac is a place.
c. tiqqun is a publication that is no longer in print.

the theory from tiqqun is a newer version of stuff the situationists were talking about. it presents a meta vision of how society works, and how we participate within the institutions that we also reject.
some crucial concepts that you can research:
human strike
terrible communities
the bloom
imaginary party

a link to an interesting review of invisible committee's thought by m. dupont is here http://whatinthehell.blogsome.com/2010/07/08/does-monsieur-dupont-think-about-tiqqun/ ...
i would not necessarily accept dupont's analysis, but they are always smart.

edited to correct misplaced modifier.
answered May 7, 2011 by dot (52,130 points)
edited May 9, 2011 by dot
Since asking the question i've read Human Strike in the Libidinal Economy. That was a fun one, though thick on the Marxian rhetoric. From my understanding it seems fair to characterize the human strike as an anarchic moment.

Ever more to read ;)
+1 vote
Not to be too pedantic, but I don't think that the accused of Tarnac, or the people who used to publish Tiqqun, or the people who may or may not make up The Invisible Committee think of themselves as anarchists. They are certainly our allies, but it's not proper to foist a label on them they would in all likelihood refuse.
answered May 8, 2011 by lawrence (550 points)
Fair point. I've edited the question to reflect this.
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